10 Most Profitable Crops to Grow On Your Farm

Filipino farmers are a dying breed, and that’s a terrifying thought.

 

Recent studies have shown that the average age of farmers in the Philippines is 57 years old. That’s only three years away from the mandatory retirement age, and the younger generation clearly isn’t keen on joining the agricultural industry, so this could mean trouble for our nation’s food supply in as little as fifteen years.

 

To be fair, the local agricultural sector is arguably the most challenging in the country. While the Philippines boasts large tracts of fertile lands, it is also besieged by frequent typhoons that can ruin an entire season’s worth of planting in a blink. There’s also the sad fact that farmers aren’t treated with a lot of dignity; a lot of them don’t own the lands they toil on, and far too many go hungry just so their children can go to school.

 
To be fair the local agricultural sector is arguably the most challenging in the country 10 Most Profitable Crops to Grow On Your Farm

Image Credit: GMA News

This isn’t to say that agriculture as an industry is not profitable, however. Quite the contrary. There’s always money to be made in feeding a country, especially if you plant the right crops or raise the right animals, such as the following:

 

1. Watermelon.

 

Filipinos’ Average Consumption Per Head Per Annum: 1.38 kg

Average Net Return (Gross Returns Less Total Costs) Per Hectare: Php113,669

Average Net Profit to Cost Ratio (Total Returns/Total Costs): 220.3%

 

2. Native Onions.

  Native Onions 10 Most Profitable Crops to Grow On Your Farm  

Filipinos’ Average Consumption Per Head Per Annum: 1.93 kg

Average Net Return (Gross Returns Less Total Costs) Per Hectare: Php131,582

Average Net Profit to Cost Ratio (Total Returns/Total Costs): 111.9%

 

3. Cauliflower.

 

Filipinos’ Average Consumption Per Head Per Annum: 0.11 kg

Average Net Return (Gross Returns Less Total Costs) Per Hectare: Php147,066

Average Net Profit to Cost Ratio (Total Returns/Total Costs): 171.9%

 

4. Garlic.

 

Filipinos’ Average Consumption Per Head Per Annum: 0.72 kg

Average Net Return (Gross Returns Less Total Costs) Per Hectare: Php155,291

Average Net Profit to Cost Ratio (Total Returns/Total Costs): 63.4%

 

5. Tilapia.

  Tilapia 10 Most Profitable Crops to Grow On Your Farm  

Filipinos’ Average Consumption Per Head Per Annum: 2.99 kg

Average Net Return (Gross Returns Less Total Costs) Per Hectare: Php157,482

Average Net Profit to Cost Ratio (Total Returns/Total Costs): 220.3%

 

6. Pineapple.

 

Filipinos’ Average Consumption Per Head Per Annum: 11.22 kg

Average Net Return (Gross Returns Less Total Costs) Per Hectare: Php166,030

Average Net Profit to Cost Ratio (Total Returns/Total Costs): 274.6%

 

7. Carrots.

 

Filipinos’ Average Consumption Per Head Per Annum: 0.61 kg

Average Net Return (Gross Returns Less Total Costs) Per Hectare: Php171,723

Average Net Profit to Cost Ratio (Total Returns/Total Costs): 224%

 

8. Potatoes.

 
Potatoes 10 Most Profitable Crops to Grow On Your Farm

Image Credit: ChoosePhilippines

 

Filipinos’ Average Consumption Per Head Per Annum: 1.02 kg

Average Net Return (Gross Returns Less Total Costs) Per Hectare: Php181,643

Average Net Profit to Cost Ratio (Total Returns/Total Costs): 133.5%

 

9. String Beans.

 

Filipinos’ Average Consumption Per Head Per Annum: Information not available

Average Net Return (Gross Returns Less Total Costs) Per Hectare: Php229,339

Average Net Profit to Cost Ratio (Total Returns/Total Costs): 187.7%

 

10. White Onions.

 

Filipinos’ Average Consumption Per Head Per Annum: 1.93 kg

Average Net Return (Gross Returns Less Total Costs) Per Hectare: Php243,542

Average Net Profit to Cost Ratio (Total Returns/Total Costs): 187.7%

 

Sure, literally getting your hands dirty isn’t the most glamorous way to earn a living, but given proper planning and enough elbow grease, farming can prove to be both lucrative and fulfilling.

Serena Estrella

Serena joined iRemit back in 2016, and has tormented its Marketing Head constantly ever since. To get through the rigors of writing about grave concerns like exchange rates, citizenship requirements, and PH-AU news, she likes to blast Mozart, Vivaldi, ONE OK ROCK, and Shigeru Umebayashi in the background. She does a mean Merida voice in her spare time too.

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